Eclectic I

Thursday, April 26, 2007

Tech Forum week 7

Gender In Music Technology



Ben Probert was curious as to why there appears to be a lack of female interest within the music Technology field. Various surveys and articles established a consistent argument that there is a masculine stereotype attached to the field. It is quite a valid point this would add extra pressure upon females within the field to exceed. In this regards, gender should not be an issue within any field.

This was essentially the main argument presented by Amy Sincock. Gender should not be of any importance within her field of choice but rather her ability and passion within her chosen field. I couldn't agree more. If a female within the music technology field (or any field) goes onto inspire and empower other females then this is a positive thing, but to specifically focus on someone’s gender regardless of ability could actually negate the importance of their ability.

I also found it linked closely to the point Stephen Whittington raised that John Cage was gay but chose not to act as a 'figure head' for gays within the avant guard music field. Could it be that he felt his sexuality was irrelevant in regards to what he created as a musician, and that possibly his music should be loved/hated for itself and their should be no bias placed upon it either way due to his sexuality.

Another point Ben rose, he described as “Different styles of mastery of technology, ‘Hard’ and ‘Soft’. The ‘hard’ absolute approach is statistically favoured by men and the ‘soft’ humanistic approach by females. Douglas Loudon attempted to attribute this to evolutionary roles. I tend to think that these roles are more socially implied and that although learning styles may have statistical gender specifics, that there is probably great flexibility to adoption of approaches and general exceptions to the rule. E.g. many men could favor/benefit from the ‘soft learning approach’ and vice versa. I think Jacob Morris touched on this idea but was more focussed on the brilliance of a particular female in the area of music tech, -Bjork.

The point of contention against these arguments however comes down to what Tristan described as 'the politics of inclusion'. In a perfect world, everyone would have equal ‘footing’ to prove and succeed based upon their abilities. But quite often minorities are forgotten/excluded/ignored, due to the simple majority wins scenario. This is why minority groups look to figure heads so that they feel that their voice will still be heard. Ultimately I feel this is a rather poignant irony, and that we should all continue to be aware of the need for equality without making an issue of something unless it is actually causing a problem.

References

Stephen Whittington. “Gender in Music Technology, Can you tell the difference?” Workshop presented at EMU space, Level 5, Schultz building, University of Adelaide, 26th April, 2007.

Ben Probert. “Gender in Music Technology.” Student talk presented at EMU space, Level 5, Schultz building, University of Adelaide, 26th April, 2007.

Douglas Loudon. “Gender in Music Technology.” Student talk presented at EMU space, Level 5, Schultz building, University of Adelaide, 26th April, 2007.

Amy Sincock. “Gender in Music Technology.” Student talk presented at EMU space, Level 5, Schultz building, University of Adelaide, 26th April, 2007.

Jacob Morris. “Gender in Music Technology.” Student talk presented at EMU space, Level 5, Schultz building, University of Adelaide, 26th April, 2007.

Pic References

jin, ohashi. 2003. Bjork Photo's. http://unit.bjork.com/specials/pics/frame.htm (28 April 2007.)

0 Comments:

Post a Comment

<< Home